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've spent a good deal of your career working on, mr. hall, has been the improvement of the american economy. and tonight i'd like to join a couple of my colleagues on the democratic side to talk about the economy and specifically to talk about jobs and the things that we can do here in the a winning days of this congress -- wanning days of this congress to create some job opportunities. we've got some very heavy lifting here in congress in the next month and a half. everybody wants to talk about the fiscal cliff, some talk about austerity, bomb, others talk about what needs to be done to lift the debt limit. and all of these issues are before us. tax increases are not. but underlying all of that, foundational to all of that, is putting america back to work. getting americans back into their jobs. if we do that we will clearly increase employment and when you increase employment you always increase tax revenue to the federal government, to state governments and local governments. so our principle task as i see it and i think i'm joined by many of my colleagues, both democratic and republican
to strengthen their muscle is when the economy is good not when it is uncertain and tough. >> so there could be a backlash from unions pushing businesses to the max because if trying to support jobs and get better benefits they may in fact be taking workers out jobs. >> any are. look what business is doing, moving with their not. if you look where business is moving in the united states --. >> one example is hostess 18,000 jobs when the unions pushed them. they are gone. >>guest: hostest. airlines. boeing. up-and-down corporate america. that is why businesses are moving to right-to-work states. the states that are getting the most movement of their businesses it is so that those states that have right-to-work states. i am not saying they shouldn't have unions, but it is the wrong time to kick business when jobs are scarce and the economy is tough. >> but unions have been in powered, vicinity they, they won the presidential candidate. some leaders say they will push congress ma make unionizing eitherrer. is this the time to push back. >>guest: they are in favor right now, the ear of the admin
, investors in the financial markets and the real economy, you need sustainability and credibility. the problem with the european union for the time being is that decisionmaking is not sustainable. the united states has a common economic area with a common currency. one central bank, one parliament, and one government. the european union has an economic area with one currency, one central bank, and 17 governments in the eurozone. how the fine trust when you have every day after the decision making, another government -- how you can find an investor going to greece, today you invest in euros. tomorrow, the currency of greece, nobody knows. what kind of investment will go to greece. the biggest problem is not to fill the gap in the public coffers of greece. my eyes, it is a credit crunch in some of the countries. i met the chairman of the greek chamber of commerce when i was there and he'd tell me we have about 300 small and middle sized companies. ferry transport is a very important element of the greek economy. in the health-care system, whatever. most of the jobs are created in sm
that could very well damage the economy. but the air of compromise among some notable republicans is definitely grabbing attention. the republicans' comments quickly caught fire. >> i will violate the pledge, long story short, for the good of the country, only if democrats will do entitlement reform. >> a pledge you signed 20 years ago, 18 years ago is for that congress. the world has changed and the economic situation is different. >> i'm not obligated on the pledge. i made tennesseans aware, i was just elected, that the only thing i'm monitoring is the oath that i take when i serve when i'm sworn in this january. >> reporter: gop lawmakers bluntly stating to alert the fiscal cliff, they're ready to break from grover norquist and the pledge he's got most republicans to sign to never raise taxes. norquist waste nod time hitting back on cnn's s"starting point" >> it doesn't pass the laugh test. if you want to go to your voters and say, i promised you this and i'm breaking that problem, you can have that conversation with them. but you don't have an argument with me. you've made a c
to make a decision and then they looked at taxes, the economy, jobs, and they went to the president. >> what is an emerging trend in technology or how people consumer information that will have implications for 2014? the leading edge? >> that is a good question. the prevalence of people getting their information online has exploded. you look as swing voters and how little they are watching tv, we all had three places you got your news from. now they get their nightly news from 15 sources. jon stewart is an important moment from that. if you are a democratic-leaning woman, you love rachel maddow. getting to those people is harder. they are way more online than anyone. you have to go to where they are. campaigns will spend more and more of their money online than ever before. until it reaches parity with television. >> and you think television will still be big in 2016. >> it is going to be the dominant media but online is going to catch up very quickly. i think it already is catching up for young voters who are looking -- >> within a couple cycles? >> no question. i think the next el
going to make the economy worse. they just keep pumping more debt in the the economy. host: you are saying go over the fiscal cliff? caller: yes. it is not even enough in my opinion to balance the budget. it is still about three times the average deficit under bush. let us go back to the clinton tax era. eileen anywhere between republican and libertarian. up -- yes i am not. i lean anywhere between republican and a libertarian. host: what do you make of republicans up on capitol hill -- to sort of a back off the tax pledge that he took when he ran for senate, saying he would not raise taxes. caller: if we are going to raise taxes my important thing is raising them on everybody. because if they try to strike a compromise where only the rich get taxed, then it gets more progressive. it is not a point to help the budget. we are right to raise taxes, raise them all the way down to where clinton had them. host: senators lindsey gramm represented peter king, talking publicly abandoning the pledge of democrats will talk seriously about entitlement reforms. rest in peace, grover norquis
to you saying, look, congress might not blow up the economy for no good reason. or if i do have to say it, i shouldn't sound excited about it. that should be a given. but in recent years, it has not been a given. and the reason it hasn't been is in some ways traceable to this guy. you know that guy. that is grover norquist. if you go by his name or his picture, he may not seem imposing. but in the republican party, he's a guy that breaks your knees if you vote for higher taxes. all republicans pretty much sign it and they are very, very, very loathed to break it. and that's made it impossible to reach a deficit reduction deal, until now. "the new york times" has an article in which republican after republican after republican goes on the record by name dismissing his pledge and his power. peter king says a pledge is good at the time you sign it. in 1941 i would have voted to declare war on japan. but each congress is a new congress and you can't have a rule that you're never going to raise or lower taxes. i don't want to rule anything out. senator of georgia said, i'm frankly not concerne
by the federal open market committee to support the economy. in addition, i will discuss important economic challenges our country faces as we close out 2012 and move into 2013, in particular the challenge of putting federal government finances on a sustainable path and the longer run while avoiding actions that would endanger the economic recovery in the near term. the economy is continuing to recover from the financial crisis and recession, but the pace of the recovery has been slower than fomc participants and others had hoped or anticipated when i spoke here last, three years ago. indeed, since the recession trough in 2009, growth in real gdp has averaged only a little more than 2% per year. similarly, the job market has improved over the past three years, but at a slow pace. the unemployment rate, which peaked at 10% in the fall of 2009, has since come down 2%, to just below 8%. this is a welcome decline, but it has taken a long time to achieve the progress, and the unemployment level is still well above its level prior to the onset of the recession and the level that our colleagues an
assess what makes consumers spend, and what impact all those purchases have on the economy. >> brown: we have two stories about continuing unrest in the middle east, beginning with the political crisis in egypt. >> suarez: then, in her final report from turkey, margaret warner looks at the growing clout of syria's kurdish minority, and the impact that's having on the other side of the border. >> brown: when does a co-worker count as a supervisor? that question was before the supreme court today in a case about harassment. marcia coyle explains. >> suarez: and we examine new figures from the pew research center showing that young voters played a decisive role reelecting president obama. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. an
for the economy." ben bernanke didn't endorse any specific tax or spending policies to solve the fiscal cliff, but he urged lawmakers to think creatively. he said an agreement on ways to reduce long-term federal budget deficits could remove road blocks to growth. on the other hand, going over the cliff might mean a recession. on top of that, worries about a deal were already causing trouble. > uncertainty about how the fiscal cliff, the raising of the debt limit, and the longer-term budget situation will be addressed appears already to be affecting private spending and investment decisions, and may be contributing to an increased sense of caution in financial markets. >> susie: wall street and business leaders were pleased that bernanke was talking tough. and they said the fed's role in the fiscal cliff negotiations is to communicate. >> tell the world and the individuals in the political establishment that they have to help get their act together or we have a problem, and that notion of preaching from the pulpit that he has is very fundamental. >> susie: is there another role or more of a ro
on the horizon. that's where we begin this morning. how confident are you about the state of the u.s. economy? what steps are you taking to prepare for the potential impact if the u.s. goes off the fiscal cliff? give us a call this morning. you can also catch up with us on all your favorite social media sites, twitter or facebook. or e-mail us. thismorning to you on wednesday, november 21. we are talking about federal reserve chairman ben bernanke's comments yesterday about the fiscal cliff, and getting your thoughts on bthe u.s. economy. and this headline -- also, in the financial times -- to tell little bit more about ben bernanke's , and sister day we turn to david clarke of "politico," their financial services editor. thanks for joining us. guest: thanks for having me. host: what is making the most waves from his speech? guest: in the past he has warned that congress and the president's path to take care of the fiscal cliff. yesterday he said it is not simply doing it but how they do it, making a point that voters will be looking to see if they can do this in a cooperative manner, whether
that in itself says that when the economy is contracting, there is a competitive advantage to having an education. >> has always struck me with my students. apple would much rather have students with a liberal arts background than a background in computer science or engineering. they are much more adaptable and capable of change. i am not aware of this study, but during the late 1990s, the business higher education forum conducted a study of ceos and see what they sought from college graduates. while they expected some skills, what they were really after was individuals that were committed to continuing having had capacity to continue to learn. not only that they are adapted to change that they can drive change and adapt to an increasingly diverse world. in that sense, it really kind of defines the important part of a liberal education is a background the background for this. the other thing i would mention we really need a liberal arts training before they enter these programs. so i think it really reinforces that. >> i think you are very bright about the data. particularly over the long-term. a
, we had huge surpluses because of the strong economy over the 1990's and deficit-reduction plans put in place over the 1990's. the government had the choice to spend that on programs, or returned it to tax payers, and the bush administration decided to return the money to taxpayers. over the following year's tax rates were lower. it was renewed in 2010 in a tax deal between president obama and congressional republicans at a time when the economy was weak and the feeling was they could not take an increase in taxes. host: what was the desired effect and did it happen? he called the desired effect was to give people more of their income back, and that happened, as wealthy people got more income back, more moderate income earners got some back. one of the questions is how it effects economic growth, and it is an unresolved area of economic research. did it did help the economy -- did it help the economy? it is hard to say. we had a good economy in the 2000's before the crisis. now we have a huge crisis. on balance, it probably did not help that much. host: can you calculate if jobs were
that would avoid that potentially devastating fiscal cliff that is looming over the u.s. economy right now. the president is meeting with small business owners at the white house today. he had a series of meetings with different business leaders over the last week. despite the warnings that the talks are stalling on capitol hill stuart varney joins me now, host of "varney & company" on fox business network. >> good morning, martha. bill:. martha: what are you hearing how this is going? >> it is impasse basically. the republicans said yesterday they accommodated the democrats they will agree to get more money from wealthy people from higher taxes but mitch mcconnell, senate republican leader, he says there has been no similar compromise from the democrats or the president. he says they are still holding out for higher tax rates on the rich and he says the radical left is prescenting the democrats and president and agreeing to serious reform from medicare. martha, i have to tell you. i got new numbers from medicare, from trustees, actually. medicare has to pay out in the future $42 trillion.
to cripple the syrian economy. eight round-trip flights between moscow and damascus delivering more than 200 tons of, quote, bank notes into syria. u.s. and european sanctions include a ban on syrian currency in an attempt to slow the violence that's killed thousands of people. syria and russian officials have so far not responded to the reports. >>> overseas tens of thousands are rallying today in cairo's tahrir square protesting what they view as a blatant power grab by president mohamed horsey. with tensions mounting yesterday, morsi appeared to soften his controversial attempt to award himself near absolute power above the reach of the law. in a vaguely worded statement, morsi spokesman backtracked slightly saying that only acts of sovereignty would be immune from oversight. >>> well, u.s. consumers went big this weekend for small business saturday. millions of holiday shoppers spent a total of $5.5 billion during the third annual local business shopping event. mika spent half of that in the south of france. and that's not even counted in that tally. for more on the holiday shopping seas
represented their interests. >> we also have a terrible economy. a weak economy is the only reason they're in the game. i'm going to end this conversation because i don't think it's been resolved, erin, and i -- erin, you made a good case for younger people. that's the future of every party. go younger. i agree with that. the problem is they have to decide ideologically can they compete for senate seats in pennsylvania, maybe not massachusetts, but new jersey, connecticut, new england? are they going to give you up a portion of the country and say, we're going to make our votes in the south? it seems to me that's a problem they've got right there. they've given up both coasts, by the way. that's my argument, not yours. robert, thank you for coming in tonight. happy thanksgiving. you should be in cars heading home. erin, you've been doing great this year. great coverage. >>> coming up, republicans aren't the only ones fighting among themselves. some progressives are warning president obama, they don't like this debt reduction deal, they'll let people hear. so it begins. also the republic
to raise taxes on small businesses because it would damage the economy. now he thinks this economy is stronger than it was two years ago and we are in better shape to take the economic hit. it is an interesting question. if you go over the tax cliff and taxes are raised dramatically, the house would have our past -- will already have passed. on the sequester, i thought if republicans won the house and senate of the president say, since it -- sequestration would not happen. it denied give up any of the savings from the sequestered . but did so by impacted the pentagon less heavily than the sequestered it. but divided government, i think you get the question. president said he does not want to change the money for the pentagon. mitch mcconnell said we are not raising taxes to ransom the pentagon budget cuts. a lot of focus has been on the pentagon but these are more concerned about the $50 billion in domestic discretionary spending restraint every year. you did to the republican study committee. the announced all a thing worse than sequestration would not be having savings. this stam
a downturn in the economy in january, then the republicans are going to say, see, we told you, even though they created the problem. >> david cay johnson, great to have you with us. that's "the ed show." "the rachel maddow show" starts right now. good evening, rachel. >> good evening, ed. thanks, man. thank you for staying with us for this hour. the acting director of the cia met for more than an hour with senators john mccain and lindsey graham along with the u.n. ambassador susan rice. the three senators emerged from the meeting saying they were honored by the fact that the cia director would meet with them, just three random senators and not in some official capacity testifying before committee on the hill. they appreciated the fact that the administration and the intelligence community was going to such lengths to e swaj their concerns to personally answer their questions about the libya attack in a closed-door meeting with the cia director himself, even though these are just three random senators. the senators said their questions were answered as reasonably could be expected a
. we have history to show that. democrats say the opposite. >> and you stimulate your economy. if you raise rates anddon't cut expenditures, what you are doing is making the fiscal problem that much worse. raising rates is aonetime revenue grab. expenditures is a long-term reduction in. and the reality is, wehave to do a lot more of expenditure reduction than we do increases in revenue. tom: do you think that the democrats and specifically the president would go along with some sort of quid pro quo where for every dollar for every $5 of reduction in spending we will have some sort of formula that raises rates? >> i think that is doable. not raising rates. think raising revenue, meaning put some limits on deductions. but some women on exemptions. but some women on some of these special deals that people have or engage in. i concede that as an avenue through which you can gain more revenue. it comes out to the sam thing. taxes go up. tom: but it's a little easier to sell. >> the promise not to increase tax rates. but none of it, i think, works. unless the white house is serious about so
1st or 11:59 the day before january 1st. it's already starting to impact the economy. whether it impacts consumers -- and we'll find out today, by the way, in terms of thanksgiving and what's that meant, whether consumers are coming out or not -- but thoorz the bigger issue that manufacturing has already started to slow down. people are starting to worry. it may end up in the economic numbers already, just the fact that we're having this debate. and then come january 1st, do we go over? what does that mean? is it the fiscal cliff? or does it look like the fiscal bungee cord? that's what some people are calling it. we go over for two weeks and then we snap back and get a deal and what does that deal look like? >> a lot of positive talk following the election. even bill kristol talking about let's feel free to raise taxes if it's part of a bigger deal. a lot of elections don't have consequences, midterm elections. this was supposed to be a status quo election. but something happened here. i think the fever is starting to break. >> absolutely. you're going to see it, i think, on
comprehensive immigration reform. he sees it as a key part to stabilizing the economy, investing in the middle class, not having a subclass of 11 million people that hurt economic revitalization. for him i think it is a piece of the middle class agenda. >> are the other unions working with senator schuman who say they are starting to work on a piece of legislation? >> the majority leader and center schumer. we have some issues with this idea, but we applaud his enthusiasm. we are trying to get him on the steps of key elements that are important to us. >> where do you disagree? >> i think he thinks a national id card is required. we do nothing that needs to be part of the solution to fixing the broken immigration system. >> washington journal continues. host:jim martin n. he will be talking about the future of health care, especially the elements of the affordable care act that are put to place. guest: glad to be here. host: what does it mean in general for older americans now that the election is over? guest: i think things like obamacare, the affordable care act, seniors were opposed to it b
this difficult time we have had with the economy. the richest of the rich will have to pay a little bit more to solve the financial problems we have in this country. [inaudible] >> right after the senate majority leader harry reid spoke, republican leaders held their own briefing and ways to find a deal and criticized leader reid's plan. this is 15 minutes. >> good afternoon, everyone. as we head into the fiscal cliff negotiations, my advice to the president would be -- seems like our friends on the other side are having difficulty turning off the campaign. we need to sit down and work this matter out. i think we have a clear sense and opportunity here at the end of the year to do something important for the country. we all know that the most critical steps to be taken are to save the entitlements, which are on an unsustainable path to bankruptcy. there's no better time to begin to fix that problem than right now. so i would hope our friends on the other side can kind of turn off the campaign and get into a cooperative mode here to reach a conclusion. which leads me to make a further observa
taxes which we think would be harmful to the economy. and if you look at how much revenue that raises, $68 billion next year, that funds a government for less than a week. and it does potential significant harm to the economy and raises taxes on the very people we are asking to go out and create jobs. >> dick durbin says when you're talking about entitlement reform or cuts in spending for medicare, medicaid for example, he says that's too complicated now. listen to what he said this morning. >> when it comes to medicare, we know that it's going to run out of money in 12 years. whatever changes we want to make should be thoughtful changes not made in the heat of the fiscal cliff. >> can you defer medicare for example -- medicare reform until after you get a deal on the fiscal cliff? >> well, if we do that, wolf, i think what you have to do is also defer the issue of taxes. i think you extend tax rates some time into the foreseeable future whether that's six months or a year and allow us to go through the process where we can deal with entitlement reform and tax reform in regular order.
of the economy, but americans didn't hold back on what turned out to be a record-breaking holiday weekend for retailers. and it's not over yet. cyber monday is officially in full swing and experts predict today will be the biggest online shopping day of the year to the tune of $1.5 billion. nbc's kristen dahlgren has more. >> reporter: from the moment doors opened thursday, before the thanksgiving dishes were even done, almost a quarter billion shoppers will have been online or in stores. >> i just prepare, put my speakers on and go for it. >> reporter: shopping started earlier than ever, and in spite of the employee protests, the early opening paid off. according to the national retail federation, more than 35 million shopped on thanksgiving, six million more than last year. black friday was big, too. 89 million braved the crowds in search of those hard-to-beat bargains, up from 86 million last year. >> the biggest wish list is -- >> uggs. >> reporter: and americans spent more, too. the average shopper spent $423 this weekend, up from $398 last year, for a total of $59.1 billion. it's no
together and use a more fitting metaphor defuse the austerity bomb that threatens to explode the economy and could decades of republican orthodoxy on rejecting new revenues finally be coming to an end? with the senate in session for 36 days to go before hundreds of billions of dollars in tax cuts hikes and cuts take affect, white house press secretary repeated everything including entitlement programs would be part of the talkings. talks. meanwhile, many are turning their back on the pledge to grover norquist. >> times changed significantly and i care more about this country than i do about a 20-year-old pledge. >> i agree, a pledge signed 20 years ago is for that congress. >> i'm willing to generate revenue. it's fair to ask my party to put revenue on the table we're build historic averages. >> it does appear that speaker boehner is open to talk about revenue entitlement reform. >> eliot: jay carney said the white house welcomed those comments and grover norquist tried to make light of them. >> some of them have engaged in impure thoughts. they have not actually voted for a tax increase
doesn't matter the economy if you don't ever have life -- >> why should a choice person vote for the continuation of this republican platform which says from the moment of conception that unborn child or fetus is a citizen with rights of property, life, and liberty? >> there are plenty of people that are pro-choice republicans that are out there just like there are plenty of pro-life democrats out there because they're going to pick their own preferences. i would disagree this party is demographically falling apart when a 49%/51% election just occurred. you look at the house of representatives and you have this large percentage of republicans there. we still are a very divided nation. >> it's going to be about 47%, and most americans voted in the house races, most americans did vote for democrats. because of gerrymandering your party got a big majority, but that's because of gerrymandering. >> it's because the democrats waste a lot of votes in big city democratic districts. 99% of the vote. >> i want to say something very important about abortion. most women who have abortion
40. >> if you're trying to forecast the economy, what matters is what america actually decides, not what it should decide. what it's actually going to decide is a small bargain that gets us through 2013 and doesn't fix the problem. that's the reality that we're going to face. >> so your gdp under that scenario for 2013, 2014, 2015 -- >> yeah, for 2012, we'll have about two quarters of 1.5%. i think we'll get some resolution by mid year so we'll grow 2.5%, maybe 3%. >> mid year. >> yeah. and then in 2013, i think you can grow 3%, maybe more as long as you have -- >> if you just let it ride? >> that's my forecast. we're not going to fix these fundamental problems except over a ten year period with 10 or 15 pieces of legislation. >> medicare alone is 42 trillion unfunded. social security 20.5 trillion. and then you add the 16 that we know about to that. none of these are in black and white those first two that i mentioned. you add it all together, 86.8. >> a lot depends on what happens to medical care. i mean, one thing that could change these estimates tremendously, find a cure f
disaster not only for our country, but the worldwide economy. >> so defaulting on the credit is unacceptable to you? >> i don't think -- i don't think it's a question that's even on the table. >> failing to raise the debt ceiling is not even on the table. that's what john boehner said last january. and yet just a few months later, with that voting record and with that stated understanding of how bad it would be for this country to not raise the debt ceiling, there was john boehner, leader of the congressional republicans, threatening to not raise the debt ceiling. e threatening default after decades of voting to raise the debt ceiling, no questions asked under president bush, under president obama the republicans decided they were not going to do it anymore. right around this time last year, republicans threatened to let the country go into default unless president obama met their demands. they explicitly recognized it would cause harm, but they were happy to do that. they were willing to incur that it harm. to inflict that harm on the country in order to get other stuff that
we should have a balanced approach to deficit reduction that doesn't hurt the economy or hurt middle class families. glad to see if you have been reading the pains more and more republicans in congress are agreeing with this idea we should have a balanced approach. >>shepard: he referenced some in the g.o.p. who signal they could be willing to play bull. the republican leadership still is insisting they will not consider tax hikes. >> republicans are willing to put revenue on the table the it is time for the president and democrats to get serious on the spending problem our country has. >>shepard: president obama continues the p.r. blitz. later today he is scheduled to meet with big business leaders to discuss the proposed fix to the fiscal cliff. ed henry is live with us at the white house. what seem it is to be lost in this is the tax cuts going to expire. that's it. if they want to extend them on some, they can. but he will not allow it on people who make more. what part of this is confusing? >>reporter: a lot of other pieces that are confusing because no one wants to come to the
with him. the goal here is to grow the economy and control spending. you're not going to grow the economy if you raise tax rates on the top two rates. we're willing to put revenue on the table as long as we're not raising rates. >> so, joy, boehner is not exactly ready to go along with the american people, it seems. >> i think what you just saw there, rev, was a man waiting for bated breath on january 3rd, hoping that every day gets shorter and shorter and shorter as long as we're still in the lame duck congress and tea party members are still there. i think john boehner still has an ounce of fear that he will lose that vote. so he's always watching his right flank. i think boehner will be in a stronger position if we get to january 3rd and there isn't a deal and he can force a deal on his tea party members but this is a guy who still has to message to the right. this deal would have to be made by the congress that just lost the election, the congress headed by the tea party. and it's iron ironic that it lost the election but boehner has to cling to it for now. >> but the american people
few years, but it's also the case. if you look at the simpson-bowles report, the rivlin-dmin economy report, the gang of six and crapo and johanns, all say we need a deal that includes $4 trillion in debt reduction over ten years, and about a third of it coming from revenues. you got revenues at 15% or just over that of gdp, and spending at 24%, and you got to bring the spending down, but you got to bring revenues up. frankly, we're not going to have a deal. gerri: it's the object of debate, debated every night here. >> yeah. gerri: i was looking at your bio, and back in 2006, you wrote a book called "how congress is failing america," you must feel that you feel all of washington is the problem at this point. is this something that can't be fixed at this point? are we not going to come to a resolution of the fiscal cliff? you've been watching this a very long time. >> i have, and i think the tragedy of this is that there's a deal to be had, and it does not involve all that much. it involves significant pain for almost everybody, but you're not going to do it without bringing that pai
think there's a very serious damage done to the economy and to the world economy and the approaches bush took running up to this and that obama is put on steroids. this is in the middle of many problems to continue to not be ended. and the was a very big problem. to be much more serious about spending and it was in that way before. >> how do you fix? >> the house republicans already passed the budget that would work and pass the extension of the tax cuts they would work and you go in and have these conversations in front of the american people without about how romney is mean to dogs and causes cancer and actually talking about issues. and i think that is a debate that we need to have. we haven't had it, certainly didn't have it in this last election and we can have it now. it's very helpful. i think at the end of the day we will make the right decision partially because the democrats are terrified of the damage that obama has to drive them over and they wouldn't actually do that as obama threatened to throw us off a cliff year ago in august and didn't. >> we weren't going to get the neg
cure the economy. the senior editor of "the atlantic" joins us live in the next half hour. he has an interesting perspective. >>> ambassador susan rice heads to capitol hill this morning to mend fences with three republican senators. john mccain, lindsey graham and kelly a at with her information comments made on several networks that played down the role of terrorists in the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya, that killed four americans including ambassador chris stevens. rice maintains she made it clear the intelligence information she had at the time was preliminary. senators have threatened to block her nomination if president obama chooses her to be his next secretary of state. >>> and the obama administration responds to the benghazi attack does not get high marks from americans. the results of a new poll out this morning shows a majority of those questioned, 54%, say they are dissatisfied with the administration's handling of the attack. >>> and the body of yasser arafat was exhumed this morning from a mausoleum in the west bank. a team of international scienti
economy by shopping at locally owned stores. the movement is in its third year. and it is growing. according to a new survey 67% of shopper who's know about small business saturday plan to take part in it. that's up 44% from last year. dave, i know this has made you very sad. hollywood is mourning the loss of larry hagman. >> j.r. >> wait a minute. it's your style j.r., my wife and the man who put cliff barnes in office. >> you have got plenty of trouble before y'all got married. i don't understand why you think she has changed. >> hey. stop. knock it off. >> classic. >> legend. >> hagman best known for his role of course as the villain j.r. ewing on his star with dallas. lost his battle with cancer dallas hospital. linda gray had this to say on the star's passing. larry hagman was my best friend for 35 years. he brought joy to everyone he knew. i will miss him enor muresly. >> she was at his side. >> he he was apparently surrounded by family and friends. >> hagman was the son of mary martin. he was also known for his role as major tony nelson in i dream of jeanne, of course, he w
serious consequences for the entire economy. a lot of details here and they are coming up inside fox report. well, just hours remain in what is expected to be the biggest online shopping day ever. the research firm core score predicts americans will spend $1.5 billion online today alone this cyber monday. that's up 20% from last year. the national retail federation reports the average holiday shopper spent $423 this weekend in stores and online. total spending an estimated $59 billion. cheryl casone live from the fox business network with us tonight. cheryl, that's a big shot in the army for the economy. isn't it? >> it certainly is, shepard. we are seeing an allot of interest in online shopping today. initial numbers into fox business about how many people are out there spending this, today cyber monday. this is going to be already the biggest cyber monday ever when it comes to sales or revenues for the nation's he biggest retailers. number one amazon.com. number two wal-mart. 122 million people shopping today on web sites with the estimate looks like at this point we are going to b
as well as our economy. my message was pretty simple. a solution is possible. republicans have been reasonable and president needs to lead. he is the only one who can get us to a solution. if that's what he wants, we'll succeed. so it was with some concern that i read this morning that the president plans to hit the road next week to drum up support for his own personal approach to the short- and long-term fiscal challenges we face. in other words, rather than sitting down with lawmakers of both parties and working out an agreement, he's back on the campaign trail, presumably with the same old talking points that we're all quite familiar with, but we already know the president is a very good campaigner. we congratulate him on his reelection. what we don't know is whether i has the leadership qualities necessary to lead his party to a bipartisan agreement on big issues like we currently face. so let me suggest that if the president wants a solution to the challenges of the moment, the people needs to be talking to are members of his own party so he can convince them of the need to ac
the modern economy, you'll hear something like the following phrase. well, the last 30 years of the american political economy has been very good for consumers, but bad for workers. well, it's not like there's two parts of me. it's just the same person who is doing both of those things. the question is in total, are you better off. and jennifer is someone who runs a small business and is in the world of retail. i want to hear what your thoughts on all of this right after we take this quick break. >>> that's the video of the walmart in georgia on black friday that we were debating whether we wanted to show. so we thought -- >> we say voyeurism -- >> well, no, we said we're only going to show it if we unpack a little bit rather than just kind of throw it out and look at those crazy people. jessica, not jennifer. we're 14 minutes into the show, i got one person who wasn't arrested saying was arrested. what was your take away from the walmart action? >> i honestly think it's inspiring. we were talking about this a moment ago. i think like the occupy movement, even if it's a sort of a symbolic mo
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